Tackling Tiger Boredom - Photo Story
Photo Story
Pixean
June 15, 2018

One of the most photographed cats the “Tiger” though can trigger a rush of adrenalin, but what if you are one of those who think “Been there done that”? You empty your pockets doing the flurry of game drives in Indian parks at times paying a premium with special all zone access to venture out in the scorching heat of the cruel Indian summer only to be faced with scenes which are dull and boring, forget adrenalin rush your body produces melatonin, inducing sleep…..so much so for a tiger safari then.

We as photographers are constantly looking for tiger action in the form of hunts, play sequences, interactions or shooting the cat in the soft morning or evening light. These are rare moments and happen once in a while. But what do you get instead on 70% of the occasions? 

Tackling Tiger Boredom - Photo Story

Tigers sitting in cemented water tanks, Tigers in the bushes, Tiger sleeping under tree shades.The subject you go out seeking is smarter than you , they give you an half opened eye look with a perplexed look as if saying go chill in a swimming pool , sit in the shade, it’s too hot to be cooking yourselves alive.

Summer sightings like these are considered to be below average owing to harsh light or man-made structures and the drooping shoulders of a lot of camera owners around me just display signs of what I term as “tiger boredom”! Over the years I have been bitten by this boredom way too often but have tried to come up with ideas to overcome it by experimenting with such tiger sightings.

As I write this note a lazy (or rather a smart) tiger is sitting in front of me in a cemented water tank cooling himself as we roast in the sun. I have my doubts if he will get up in the next couple of hours. But I love the commitment level of the photographer and the subject! Just like I have committed myself to be burnt alive, this tiger is committed to chilling in its pool and we both haven’t given up on each other. And while I hope he gets into action at some point eventually, let me pen down some thoughts on how to encounter this tiger boredom.

Shooting Portraits

We all start off with shooting tiger portraits, some graduate to learning how to zoom out and capturing the majestic feline in its environs, some never do. It’s after all the world’s most photogenic cat.

But in a scenario where you can’t do much with the environs have you thought of doing an extreme portrait of the cat. Stacking up all the glass in your kit for a tight close up of the eye if it’s open, or the nose or experimenting with the depth of field by keeping certain parts of the face in focus and blurring the rest. IMHO these are some engaging exercises that can keep you engaged while your body cooks itself, making the stepping out in the sun a little more worthwhile.

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The Dissection Technique for Portraits 

From head to tail the tiger is by far a charismatic subject and as a photographer I see frames and perspectives in every part of its body. What better than a lazy tiger sitting out in the open to hone your observation skills. Stripes, paw, powerful back hunches, nose,  whiskers – each and every body part of the tiger has a hidden image which is fun to explore. Never went to a Zoology practical class, try that out with your camera and lens on the most majestic subject available.

The Cement Issue

We crib about our cities being a concrete jungle but then we encounter concrete in the jungles too, what a bummer that’s what you ran away from to begin with.

Tigers in cemented water tanks has become a critical national problem for photographers. The joy of a sighting simply evaporates in minutes with the sight of a cement. Even I didn’t pick up my camera many years ago to photograph something which isn’t natural. One fine summer around 6 years ago, I noticed something during one of my safaris in Bandhavgarh which changed my thought process. Extreme portraits are of course an easy way to deal with the cement issue, but what else can be done. What caught my eye was the trail of water dripping from the belly when the cat got up from the water and ever since I have been thinking of images around the belly waterfalls.

Reflections

Cement water holes have a unique feature. Before the tongue of a tiger touches these water bodies the water is still and the stillness gives a mirror like reflection and there are plenty of opportunities which can be explored around reflections. Even once the process of water going in the system is on, the ripples in the water can create some great tiger abstractions.

So the next time you spend a bomb to venture on a full day safari in peak summers risking a sunstroke, don’t doze off to give the sleeping cat company. Tigers have been widely photographed in today’s time but in my opinion there are tons of tiger images yet to be taken. Make the best of what you have, challenge your brain cells, trigger those creative juices and make the adventure out in the sun worth your while.

And once you are through with your experimentations you can also think of more ideas and sit in front of a lazing tiger to kill your boredom by writing a similar note for the benefit of mankind.


About author- Shivang Mehta

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A journalist who turned into a PR professional and handled corporate communications and PR roles with leading edge companies like Bharti, Google, Evalue serve and now a traveller and natural-history photographer – Shivang Mehta has worn many professional hats. His love for the forests of Kumaon pushed him to choose Corbett as his main area of work and he left the cozy comforts of corporate offices to work on the field with his organisation Nature Wanderers which he started 10 years back.

Over the years Shivang through Nature Wanderers has conducted over 400 wildlife photography workshops in the past decade and is now an official trainer for Canon India as he conducts wildlife photography workshops in association with Canon across India, Sri Lanka and Africa. His love for photography, writing and storytelling made him a freelance journalist as well as he has written travel notes, columns on travel and conservation for numerous national and international publications.

Shivang Mehta currently grooms young amateur photographers who are working with him for his projects around rare species photo expeditions like Red Panda, Fishing Cat, Phyr’s Leaf Monkey, Snow Leopards and many other unique species. Shivang Mehta also conducts specialised advance field training sessions on DSLR camera trap photography and other forms of unique camera technologies for photographers who wish to explore these new dimensions of wildlife photography.

Shivang Mehta’s flagship set-up Nature Wanderers (NW) pioneered the concept of wildlife photography tours a decade ago and since then NW has conducted more than 400 field photography workshops and expeditions across various genres of nature photography catering to over 2000 amateur photographers across India. NW has also organised the annual India’s Only Live Photography Contest called Canon Wild Clicks since 2010 which has become a competition of repute and credibility over the years because of its transparent judgement and field photography mentoring by an expert panel of mentors.

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